Love is Infinite
Who lives in a pineapple under the tree? (Taken with Instagram)

Who lives in a pineapple under the tree? (Taken with Instagram)

haddie:

Highlighters. Once you start, there’s just no stopping.

haddie:

Highlighters. Once you start, there’s just no stopping.

#obsessed with #highlighters (Taken with instagram)

#obsessed with #highlighters (Taken with instagram)

Starting to miss @jstinson so I made a love collage ❤ (Taken with instagram)

Starting to miss @jstinson so I made a love collage ❤ (Taken with instagram)

#dennisthemenace (Taken with instagram)

#dennisthemenace (Taken with instagram)

My arsenal. #scrubtherapy (Taken with instagram)

My arsenal. #scrubtherapy (Taken with instagram)

headlikeanorange:

A male Six-plumed Bird-of-Paradise tidies up his display area and tries to attract a female.

This is an article about Chimpanzees and their acute awareness of what another Chimp knows or not. Apes truly amaze me…

So many reasons why I love you so.

fyeahwildlife:

What is a Bonobo?

Bonobos are complex beings with profound intelligence, emotionality, and sensitivity.

Are Bonobos like chimps? Are we related to them?

Biologically speaking, bonobos are the closest you can get to being human without being human. Bonobos look more like humans than other apes, and display many behavioral similarities as well. Bonobos and people share more than 98% of the same genetic make-up (DNA). Bonobos and their cousins the chimpanzees, are more closely related genetically to us than they are to gorillas!

Bonobo society…

In contrast to the competitive, male-dominated culture of their close relative the chimpanzee, bonobo society is peaceful, matriarchal and more egalitarian. Bonobos live in large groups where harmonious coexistence is the norm. While in many ways, males and females have “separate but equal” roles, females carry the highest rank, and the sons of ranking females are the leaders among males. Females form close bonds and alliances, which is another way they maintain their power among males, who are larger and stronger physically.

Make love, not war!

 
Bonobos seem to ascribe to the 1960s hippie credo, “make love, not war.” They make a lot of love, and do so in every conceivable fashion. Beyond that, they are very loving too, showing care and compassion for each other in many ways. Sex in bonobo society transcends reproduction, as it does in humans. It serves as a way of bonding, exchanging energy and sharing pleasure.
Bonobos have been described as “pansexual” by psychologist Frans de Waal. Sex permeates the fabric of bonobo society, weaving through all aspects of daily life. It serves an important function in keeping the society together, maintaining peaceful, cooperative relations. Besides heterosexual contact, both male and female bonobos engage in same-sex encounters, and even group sex occurs. Female-female contact, or “GG-rubbing,” is actually the most common. Unlike other apes, bonobos frequently copulate face-to-face, looking into each others eyes. When bonobo groups meet in the forest, they greet each other, bond sexually, and share food instead of fighting. Likewise, almost any conflict between bonobos is eased by sexual activity, grooming, or sharing food.

 
ALL QUOTES © the Bonobo Conservation Initiative website, found here: http://www.bonobo.org/whatisabonobo.html

So many reasons why I love you so.

fyeahwildlife:

What is a Bonobo?

Bonobos are complex beings with profound intelligence, emotionality, and sensitivity.

Are Bonobos like chimps? Are we related to them?

Biologically speaking, bonobos are the closest you can get to being human without being human. Bonobos look more like humans than other apes, and display many behavioral similarities as well. Bonobos and people share more than 98% of the same genetic make-up (DNA). Bonobos and their cousins the chimpanzees, are more closely related genetically to us than they are to gorillas!

Bonobo society…

In contrast to the competitive, male-dominated culture of their close relative the chimpanzee, bonobo society is peaceful, matriarchal and more egalitarian. Bonobos live in large groups where harmonious coexistence is the norm. While in many ways, males and females have “separate but equal” roles, females carry the highest rank, and the sons of ranking females are the leaders among males. Females form close bonds and alliances, which is another way they maintain their power among males, who are larger and stronger physically.

Make love, not war!

Bonobos seem to ascribe to the 1960s hippie credo, “make love, not war.” They make a lot of love, and do so in every conceivable fashion. Beyond that, they are very loving too, showing care and compassion for each other in many ways. Sex in bonobo society transcends reproduction, as it does in humans. It serves as a way of bonding, exchanging energy and sharing pleasure.

Bonobos have been described as “pansexual” by psychologist Frans de Waal. Sex permeates the fabric of bonobo society, weaving through all aspects of daily life. It serves an important function in keeping the society together, maintaining peaceful, cooperative relations. Besides heterosexual contact, both male and female bonobos engage in same-sex encounters, and even group sex occurs. Female-female contact, or “GG-rubbing,” is actually the most common. Unlike other apes, bonobos frequently copulate face-to-face, looking into each others eyes. When bonobo groups meet in the forest, they greet each other, bond sexually, and share food instead of fighting. Likewise, almost any conflict between bonobos is eased by sexual activity, grooming, or sharing food.

ALL QUOTES © the Bonobo Conservation Initiative website, found here: http://www.bonobo.org/whatisabonobo.html

And in that moment, I swear we were infinite.
The Perks of Being A Wallflower